Revisions

Revisions Spring 2015

Quuens College - Revisions a journal on writing at Queens College

Issue link: http://digital.qc.cuny.edu/i/528969

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mis actividades dia o soy afortunado de ser bilingüe. Y en el español y el inglés juntos, aunque el ferido. Yo entiendo bien el español en la fer las películas y en las canciones. Si algui la ódico o articulo para traducirlo en ingl ó en. Sin embargo, también tengo que e , y casi siempre hay errores en mi ma , o admito que yo he descuidado de o n diccionario bilingüe para saber lo n en mis clases. Mi español me ayudó e palabras de otros lenguajes que yo p es uno de las lenguas romances, labras y dichos en portugués, italia tín. Si alguien hable uno de estos len t ellos podrán entender un poco de las l je español es un tesoro que recibí j sible decir cuál de los dos es superior, i us bellezas. Yo pido para la gente biling us por ser un privilegio y un talento poder p o pienso de mis actividades dia afortunado de ser nglés ju do bien en las ulo p arg m Mny Mkubw bw bin T. Unay ay maisha baada ya maje malenga wetu. … Mnyampala? Boss! I am K., so ou enjoying life after death? What do our oets say? … Katika shairi kuna makosa am aa niyasahihishe. La kwanza liko msita za. Neno " Mkubwa" liwe "mbukw ala alikuwa Mgogo kutoka "Mbukwa"m in T gu) K yam uz t to one s tim and live in a society it can bring pleasure to o work. If one wants money on how much time one should spend t money is understood to be the result o irrespective of structural factors. A noted Am century that emphasis on individualistic American culture, unshared by other cul disruptive force in society. The trouble with soc patterns, and as such can only speak in genera exceptions. But the point holds: American culture one cannot speak of a single Arab cul ab cul multi-religious, Asian, African and West West equivalent expression of "time me gold." Gold does not tr nite precious r in the world exists as one ab America ca America cans an o a ch eigners that came in. In 1896, the great on could fight off—and defeat— an invading European a l ion pia remained independent. Forty years later, in 1935, Benito Mussol ab c st iopia remai is Fascist army went in again to try to make Ethiopia an Italian colony. Tha W me his Fascist army nteresting happened along the way. Though many returned to Italy, so ien ien f B s. But something interesting happened along the way. Though many returned to Italy, so o er l ey had tried to conquer, and they made it their new home. Both nat nat tay in the country they had tried to conquer, and they made it their new home. Both nations wo lef a ó lop between their people: children from one place were born in the o o x relationships develop between their people: children from one place were born in the other; some lef m ó e some, raised in Italy, wondered about the land of their mothers. Famili li a a a arch of fathers; some, raised in Italy, wondered about the land of their mothers. Families were soon m a e ures, and a new one emerged in the process. In the decades following the 1935 wa wa Ara nd Ara Ara h c ca h cultures, and a new one emerged in the process. In the decades following the 1935 war, Ethiopians wa ly o eir country move slowly towards modernization, buckle under the weight of poverty and d famine, and nearly n n ollapse under a revolution and a series of repressive regimes. Somehow, Ethiopia would gather herself again e gain. The stories coming from this history are of the country's collapse and rise, of her people's migration an p esistance, of deeply personal despair and hope. Whenever I read them, sitting in my apartment in NYC, I fin f e myself caught in that shifting space that immigrants must inhabit—not all the time, not e every day, but just of l nough to remind us of birthplace and home and the landscapes that separate those two wo words. They remind m t l nything, of my own hybrid life, as American as it is anything else. I am not the same type e of Ethiopian as m h el el j ther, but maybe the truth is that neither is she the same kind of Ethiopian as her mother, or or her grandmoth j ib re her. Every generation witnesses change. They accommodate time, history, geo-politics, and and the simple h if si s ning to know more, to travel further, to experience difference. I come from a country with close se to 90 diff s u po of over 84 million, site of some of the most astounding discoveries in t ges, with a with a population of over 84 million, site of some of the most astounding discoveries in the sc ere. Our history is vast, our identities so multitudinous, that if on p ny ny b volution. There is so much here. Our history is vast, our identities so multitudinous, that if one million responses in 90 languages. When I was asked rece E w na Ethiopian, there could be 84 m e journal Words Without Borders, the magnitude of y y n Ethiopian literature for the j lect for range? How to avoid reading each story o find the stories and sele value of translators, of readers of trans a hat do our hat do our h Wh W ounting? The va d what I could with nue. Ethiop o mistrus world tha ial asp Adwa lian I S S U E 1 2 , S P R I N G 2 0 1 5 : S P A C E S O F M U L T I L I N G U A L I S M Spaces of MultilingualiSM

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